Remembering My Creator Volume 4, Number 2, September/October, 2018 Theme: Thoughts From 1st and 2nd Thessalonians

In This Issue

 

  • “Paul Remembers: How the Church was born, nurtured and established (1st Thessalonians Chapters 1-3)” by Randy Sexton
  • “Paul Exhorts: In Holiness, harmony, honesty, hope and helpfulness (1st Thessalonians Chapters 4-5)” by Randy Sexton
  • “Encouragement in Suffering (2nd Thessalonians Chapter 1)” by Hannah Clark
  • “Book of Second Thessalonians Chapter 3” (Reprint) by William C. Sexton

 

 

 

Paul Remembers: How the Church was born, nurtured and established (1st Thessalonians Chapters 1-3)

 

By

 

Randy Sexton

 

A Church is Born (Chapter 1)

The Background of the city of Thessalonica is very impressive. Today it is the second largest city in Greece, behind Athens. During World War I, it served as an important Allied base. The city has a long history. Originally it was known as Therma, but was renamed Thessalonica in 315 B.C. after the half-sister of Alexander the Great. At the time that Paul wrote this letter, 200,000 people lived there. The population was a mix of Greeks, Romans, and Jews. The church here was established by Paul on his second missionary journey (Acts 17:1-15). Paul had only been at Thessalonica “three Sabbath days” (Acts 17:2) before the Jews stirred up trouble and he had to leave. Scripture says “the brethren immediately sent Paul and Silas away by night to Berea” (Acts 17:10). Regardless, we know that Paul worked at his tent making trade to support himself (1Thess. 2:9; 2 Thess. 3:6-15). Despite his short stay, his teaching was solid enough to leave behind a thriving church. When he left for Athens, Paul told Timothy and Silas to remain behind there and help the new church and then join him later.

 

The Burden that Paul had for his brethren is evident in his writings. He wrote the two letters to the Thessalonians to assure them of his love and concern and to ground them in the doctrines of the faith, particularly with reference to Christ’s return. He recognized that they might be tempted to compromise the truth in the face of severe persecution. He also wrote to encourage them to live holy lives. There seemed to be some confusion among these brethren in regard to the second coming of Christ and about those who had already died. Paul comforts them with what he wrote (1Thess. 4:13-18).

 

The Blessing in the message of 1st and 2nd Thessalonians is the return of Jesus Christ and how this vital doctrine can affect our lives and churches and make us more spiritual. This book is unique in that every chapter ends with a reference to the second coming of Christ (1:10; 2:19; 3:13; 4:13-18; 5:23). With this emphasis on steadfastness and holy living, an appropriate theme might be: HOLINESS IN VIEW OF THE COMING OF CHRIST.

 

Paul addresses the Thessalonians as An Elect People (1:1-4). Paul is joined by Silvanus and Timothy in Corinth, where he is when he writes this epistle.  They had been with him when the gospel was first preached in Thessalonica. Paul offers his salutation along with a petition for grace and peace. He follows with an expression of thanksgiving for their work of faith, labor of love, and patience of hope, knowing their election by God.

 

He recognizes them as An Exemplary People (1:5-7). They had received the gospel not only in word, but in power, in the Holy Spirit, and in much assurance. They had imitated Paul and Jesus by receiving the word in much affliction and joy, they in turn had become examples to all the believers in Macedonia and Achaia.

 

They are further described by Paul as An Enthusiastic People (1:8). They were faithful in sounding out the word in every place, and in the process, the news of their own faith toward God had so spread that Paul did not need to tell others about them. In fact, others were telling Paul of the Thessalonians’ conversion from idols to serve the true God, and how they were waiting for the resurrected Jesus to return from heaven who would deliver them from the wrath to come.

 

The Thessalonians were An Expectant People (1:9-10). Based upon what they had been taught, they were fully expecting the return of Christ. They were known as a people who were waiting for the resurrected Jesus to return from heaven and to deliver them from the persecutions they were suffering then and from wrath to come.

 

A Church is Nurtured (Chapter 2)

“Just as God uses people to bring the Gospel to the lost, so He uses people to nurture the babes in Christ and help lead them to maturity. The church at Thessalonica was born through the faithful preaching of the apostle and his helpers, and the church was nurtured through the faithful pastoring that Paul and his friends gave to the infant church. This helped them to stand strong in the midst of persecution” (The Bible Exposition Commentary, Volume 2 by Warren Wiersbe, p. 163).

 

“Reflections Regarding His Conduct (2:1-12)

Having reflected upon their reception of the gospel, Paul now reflects upon his own conduct while with them. He describes the manner of his preaching as one that was free of guile, deceit, flattery, and covetousness. Seeking not the glory of men, but of God, he spoke with boldness despite conflict, and was gentle among them as a nursing mother would be with her own children (1-8). His manner of life was sacrificial, working hard not to be a burden to them, behaving devoutly, justly, and blamelessly while among them. As a father does his own children, he exhorted, comforted and charged them to walk in a way worthy of God who was calling them into His own kingdom and glory (9-12).

 

Reflections Regarding His Concerns (2:13-20)

Paul then begins to reflect upon the concern that he has for their condition. Thankful for their reception

of his gospel as the word of God and not of men, he writes how they had imitated the churches in Judea

in receiving the word among much persecution by their own countrymen (13-16). Even though it has

only been a short time since he has seen them, he has desired to come to them time and again, but Satan had hindered him. His longing to see them is due to his view of them as his hope, joy and crown of

rejoicing in the presence of Jesus when He comes again (17-20).”

(The First Epistle To The Thessalonians, p. 10, Executable Outlines, Copyright © Mark A. Copeland, 2001)

 

A Church Is Established (Chapter 3)

“In the first two chapters, Paul explained how the church was born and nurtured. Now he dealt with the next step in maturity: how the church was to stand. The key word in this chapter is establish (vv. 2 and 13)(The NASB uses the word “strengthen” in verse 2, but many other translations use the same word in both verses-RS). The key thought is expressed in 3:8: “For now we live, if ye stand fast in the Lord” (Wiersbe, p. 171).

 

“As Paul expresses his concern for their faithfulness, he explains why Timothy had been sent to them while he himself remained in Athens. Fearful that their afflictions might have given Satan an opportunity to tempt them and render his labors with them in vain, Timothy was sent to establish and encourage them in their faith (1-5).

 

Timothy brought back good news to Paul concerning the church at Thessalonica, telling him of their faith and love, their fond memories of Paul, and their desire to see him again. This greatly comforted Paul who was suffering his own afflictions, and he is overwhelmed with thankfulness and joy. Praying night and day that he might see them again and perfect what is lacking in their faith, he offers a prayer that God and Jesus might direct his way to them. He also prays that the Lord will help them to increase and abound in love to one another and to all, and to establish their hearts blameless in holiness before God at the coming of Christ with all His saints (6-13)” (Copeland, p. 13).

 

As we read this first epistle to the Thessalonians, we should be encouraged. Even though we do not face the tremendous physical persecution that these brethren faced, we may be subjected to social persecutions. Young people, you especially may face peer pressure that takes a great deal of courage and faith to resist. I pray that the word of the Apostle Paul to these first century Christians will help you in your walk with Christ.

 

Thanks for reading …

Randy

 

 

Paul Exhorts: In Holiness, harmony, honesty, hope and helpfulness (1st Thessalonians Chapters 4-5)

 

By

 

Randy Sexton

 

As we look at the final two chapters of 1st Thessalonians, the following outline by Warren Wiersbe may be helpful:

  1. How to Please Your Father (4:1-12)
  2. Walk in Holiness (vv. 1-8)
  3. Walk in Harmony (vv. 9-10)
  4. Walk in Honesty (vv. 11-12)

 

  1. The Comfort of His Coming (4:13-18)
  2. Revelation: We Have God’s Truth (vv. 13, 15a)
  3. Return: Christ is Coming Again (vv. 14-15)
  4. Resurrection: The Christian Dead (vv. 15-16)
  5. Rapture: Living Believers Caught Up (v. 17)
  6. Reunion: Christians Forever with the Lord (vv. 17-18)

 

III. Don’t Walk in Your Sleep! (5:1-11)

  1. Knowledge and Ignorance (vv. 1-2)
  2. Expectancy and Surprise (vv. 3-5)
  3. Soberness and Drunkenness (vv. 6-8)
  4. Salvation and Judgment (vv. 9-11)

 

  1. It’s All in the Family (5:12-28)
  2. Family Leadership (vv. 12-13)
  3. Family Partnership (vv. 14-16)
  4. Family Worship (vv. 17-28)

 

Also, as you read the Bible text, consider the following summaries of this good brother.

Chapter Four

“With this chapter Paul begins a series of apostolic instructions related to the Christian’s walk in holiness, especially in view of the coming of Christ. Urging them to abound more and more so that they might please God, he first focuses on their sanctification and the need to abstain from sexual immorality (1-8). He then urges them to increase more and more in brotherly love, even though they had been taught by God to love another and did so toward all the brethren throughout Macedonia (9-10). That they might walk properly toward outsiders, he urges them to lead quiet lives, mind their own business, and to work with their own hands (11-12).

 

Paul then addresses the matter of those who have fallen asleep in Jesus. He did not want the Thessalonians to sorrow over them as others who have no hope. For just as God raised Jesus from the dead, even so He would bring with Him those who sleep in Jesus (13-14). This leads to a description of the Lord’s coming, especially as it relates to how those who are alive and remain until His coming will in no way precede those who have died. Indeed, when the Lord comes from heaven, the dead in Christ will rise first, and we who are alive and remain will at that time be caught up together with them to meet the Lord in the air, to be with Him forever. Christians should therefore comfort one another with these words (15-18).

 

Chapter Five

“Continuing his apostolic instructions, Paul knows he does not need to write to the Thessalonians concerning the timing of the Lord’s coming, for they know full well that He will come as a thief in the night and with sudden destruction catch many people unexpectedly (1-3). Such should not be the case for Christians, however, for they are “sons of light” and “sons of the day”; therefore they should watch and be sober, putting on the breastplate of faith and love, and having as a helmet the hope of their salvation (4-8). Knowing that God has appointed them to obtain salvation through Jesus Christ, they know that whether dead or alive they will live with Christ. Through such hope they should therefore comfort and edify one another, just as they were doing (9-11).

 

A series of exhortations follows. First, to recognize and esteem those who labor among them and are over them in the Lord, and to be at peace among themselves (12-13). Then, exhortations related to our

concern for one another, along with a call to rejoice always, to pray without ceasing, to give thanks in everything, to quench not the Spirit nor despise prophecies, yet testing all things, holding fast to what is good and abstaining from all that is evil (14-22).”

(The First Epistle To The Thessalonians, pp. 16, 20, Executable Outlines, Copyright © Mark A. Copeland, 2001)

 

Young people, It is so important for us as we read this epistle of the Apostle Paul to these Christians of the first century, to see application in our own lives. May I suggest the following applications?

  • We should live in such a way that we are examples to others and when they think of us they think of our work of faith, labor of love, and steadfastness of hope
  • We should be busy about planting the seed of God’s word in the hearts of others and, as we do that, we should let the truth of God’s word speak for itself; we should not attempt to use “flattering speech” to persuade.
  • We should always be willing and eager to accept the word of God for what it is and make corrections in our lives.
  • We should continuously be examining our walk in the light of God’s word; so that we improve in those areas where we are weak, and so that we “excel still more” in those areas where we are strong.
  • We should be informed about the second coming of Christ and always be prepared for that day, knowing that no one knows when it will take place.

 

Thanks for reading …

Randy

 

 

Encouragement in Suffering – 2 Thessalonians Chapter 1

Thoughts by Hannah Clark

 

A while back I saw a picture on Facebook with pretty font and at first glance, I thought it said “So weary of the seed.” I scrolled back up to get a better look and realized it actually said “Sowers of the seed.” It got me thinking, how often do we feel weary of living by “the seed” (or the word of God)? How often do we take blessings for burdens? It’s something I’ve struggled with in my attitude of late but am also reminded that it’s not a feeling isolated to myself. Present Christians and those of the first century church in the New Testament all face various trials and tribulations. It’s our attitudes and decision to bend our wills to that of the Lord’s that sets up apart from the rest of the world.

I thought I was just having a rough time but when I look around at my co-workers, they are struggling too (not just physically but spiritually). On tough days, one thing that helps me gain a better perspective is taking a moment to try and help someone else out. It helps me see that I’m more blessed than I realize and am guilty of taking my blessings for granted far too easily. This life isn’t an easy one and that is why we have fellow Christians/brethren so that we can help one another – Christ didn’t intend for us to “go it alone.” The church in Thessalonica worked together for righteousness, despite the persecution they faced.

Paul’s second letter to the Thessalonians isn’t long but I love the way it begins. Verse 2 says “Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.” If that isn’t a way to start a letter, I don’t know what is. Paul then goes on to commend them for their faith and love toward one another and even boasts of the patience despite the “persecutions and tribulations” that they endure (vs. 3-4). There are congregations now, especially in other countries, which face greater persecution than we do here in America. However, in the past and present, there were and are still “those who do not know God” and “those who do not obey the gospel” (vs. 8). Paul states in verse 9 that those people will be “punished with everlasting destruction.” Through suffering, we can find strength in Paul’s words not only to the Thessalonians but also when he told the brethren at Corinth to “be steadfast, immovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, know that your labor is not in vain” (I Corinthians 15:58).

Paul tells the brethren in 2 Thessalonians chapter 1 that their righteousness will count them as worthy for the kingdom of God (vs. 5) and that God will “repay with tribulation those who trouble you” (vs. 6). The same holds true for us today. Whatever life may throw our way or however the devil may choose to tempt us, our righteousness will be rewarded. And for those that may wrong us as we try to sow the seed, remember what Jesus said in Matthew 5:44, “But I say to you, love your enemies, bless those who curse you, do good to those who hate you, and pray for those who spitefully use you and persecute you.”

 

Book of Second Thessalonians Chapter 3

 

Reprint from the Works of William C. Sexton

 

Introduction:  This third and final chapter of this book points to how discipline of people needs to be administered, if and when they do not conduct themselves according to the inspired teachings. This is a matter that is not always carried out, and if attempted, often trouble develops because it is not supported by all members of a congregation.

 

In the first five verses we are told of Paul’s request for their prayers that the word of the Lord would have frees course and that unreasonable and wicked men would not be able to keep it from having it’s effect. In line with that, the Lord would establish them and keep them from evil. He expressed his “confidence” in the Lord to perform His part and enable them to do “the things which” he had commanded them. He pointed to the Lord directing them relative to LOVE and PAITIENCE in “waiting for Christ.” (2 Thess. 3:1-5).

 

He commands them, using the authority of Christ Jesus, “that ye withdraw yourselves from every brother” who walks “disorderly, and not after the tradition which ye receives of me.” He reminds them of how he had conduced himself among them He had not been “disorderly,” among them, eating another’s “bread for naught.” Instead he had labored night and day, that he “might not be chargeable to any of “ them. He could and did call them as witnesses of his behavior. His behavior was not done because he didn’t have the power/right to have their financial support, but he was motivated to be “an ensample,” meaning example of course, for them to “follow” him. He reminds them that while he was with them, he “commanded” them “that if any would not work, neither should he eat.” (2 Thess. 3:6-10).

 

His knowledge comes from someone telling him that “there are some which walk among you disorderly, working not at all, but are busybodies.” This was shameful then, as it is today. When people are not busy working to support themselves, they become busybodies, meddling in things that are unprofitable. I believe we need to recognize the evil involved in such a lifestyle, and do what we can to correct them, according to God’s directions. The Bible does not support the lazy person who will not work to support self and contribute to others that  are really needy (Cf. Eph. 4:28; 1 Tim. 5:8). When such people are members of a congregation, they are to be dealt with as Paul here gives directions: “Now them that are such we command and exhort by our Lord Jesus Christ, that with quietness they work, and eat their own bread.” He tells them not to be “weary in well doing.” That is needed to be reminded when God directs us to take such action, then we need not be worry in such. Even more directly he tells them: “If any man obeys not our word by this epistle, note that man, and have no company with him, that he may be ashamed.” Notice the aim of such action: It’s to cause a person to see his misconduct and be ashamed so that he can/will return to behaving as the Lord demands! Then a cautionary note is give as to our relationship with that person: “Yet count him not as an enemy but admonish him as a brother.” (2 Thess. 3:11-15).

 

Paul closes this letter by pointing to “peace” that the Lord gives, as He is with them. The “token” of each of his letters is to give his salutation with his “own hand.” Wishing the “grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you all.” (2 Thess. 3:16-18).

 

Questions

  1. Finally what did Paul request of these brethren as he opens this chapter (2 Thess. 3:1-2)

 

  1. What did he say the Lord is “faithful” in doing (2 Thess. 3:3)?

 

  1. What did Paul have “confidence” concerning (2 Thess. 3:4-5)

 

4). What matter did Paul given direction concerning in v. 6-15)?

 

  1. What action is commanded relative to “every brother” who does walk how (2 Thess. 3:6)?:

 

6.How had Paul conducted himself among them for what reason (2 Thess. 3:7-9))?

 

  1. When with them what had he “commanded” (2 Thess. 3:10)?

 

8.What had he heard about some there and his direction to corrective action (2 Thess. 3:11 12)

 

9.What is the aim of such action, and attitude toward a disciplined brother (2 Thess. 3:13-15) ?

 

  1. How did he close the letter (2 Thess. 316-18)?